Texas Coral snake
(Micrurus fulvius tener)


The Texas Coral snake is a colorful diurnal snake (active during the day). Their prefer living amongst rotting wood in dense forest areas. Sightings of this species of Coral snake is common due to them being active in day light.

Micrurus fulvius tener has been elevated to full species. The M. tener is the Texas Harlequin Coral snake. The M. fulvius and M. tener distribution change occurs in Northern and Central Louisiana. Thus, M. tener ranges from the aforementioned through southwestern Arkansas, southwestward through Texas to Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Central Tamaulipas.

Micrurus tener - Texas Coral snake - black neck band extends forward to include rear tips of parietal scales. They differ from the Eastern Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius) in the fact that the black flecks on the red is more scattered. Keep in mind that the Non-poisonous - Coral mimic snakes and Venomous Coral snakes both have round pupils. The Texas Coral snake is generally diurnal and the mimic milksnake is generally nocturnal, so you are more apt to see a Coral snake than a milksnake during the day.

They are in the family of snakes called Elapidae, (Cobras, Mambas, Taipans, Sea snakes). Their venom is neurotoxic, which means it attacks the nervous system. Neurotoxic venom in certain quantities can cause dizziness, numbness, slurred speech, loss of muscle control, paralysis and even heart failure.

The Texas Coral snake on average is from 2 to 2 1/2 feet in length and has a very small head and mouth. They do not have the highly powerful venom delivery system of the pit vipers, and have short fangs that are about 1/8 of an inch long. This makes it very difficult for them to bite a person and to have time to deliver their venom into their victims system.


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Eastern Coral Snake
(Micrurus fulvius fulvius)


Subspecies: Eastern, Texas
Length: 22 to 47 1/2 inches
Elapidae

The Eastern Coral snake is tricolored with every other ring being yellow; rings completely encircle the body; head rather blunt, and black at snout. The red rings have black spots that are not as scattered as they are on the Texas Coral snake (Micrurus fulvius tener). Non-poisonous Coral mimic snakes and Coral snakes both have round pupils.

They can lay anywhere from 3 to 12 eggs in June. The young hatch in September and are approximately 7 to 9 inches in length.

They prefer to live in densely vegetated areas near ponds or streams, in hardwood forests, moist areas, pine flatwoods, canyons and rocky hillsides. Their range is anywhere from North Carolina, Key Largo & south Florida, Louisiana to south Texas & Mexico.

Their diet consists of small snakes, newborn mice, lizards and lizard eggs.

Do not confuse this venomous species with its harmless Coral mimics such as the Scarlet snake and Scarlet King snake.

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Texas Scarlett Snake
Mimic Coral Snake
(Cemophora coccinea lineri)


The Texas Scarlet snake is found in sandy thickets along the Gulf Coast.

Its has a gray or white ground color with 17 to 24 deep red blotches that are bordered by black. Its black borders do not join. An adult can be up to 26 inches in length.

Their diet consists of lizards, small snakes, newborn mice and other small animals. They also feed on reptile eggs by swallowing or cracking them with their teeth at the back of their upper jaw.

As many as 3 to 8 eggs are laid mid-summer underground or in rotten logs. The young immerse about 2 months later and are smaller clones of their species. Hatchlings are 5 to 6 inches long.

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Northern Scarlet Snake
Mimic Coral Snake
(Cemophora coccinea copei)


The Northern Scarlet snake is a rather uncommon burrowing snake, that uses its pointed nose to burrow with. It can be found most frequently under the loose bark of dead trees and logs. This snake prefers soft, sandy or loamy soils suitable for burrowing.

It feeds on reptile eggs, lizards, rodents and small snakes. Their average length is 14 to 20 inches to a maximum length of 2 feet.

It rarely bites when handled. Its has a gray or white ground color with 17 to 24 deep red blotches that are bordered by black. The black borders join on the lower sides of the snake forming a lateral line. Note that the first color on the nose is red.

As many as 3 to 8 eggs are laid mid-summer underground or in rotten logs. The young immerse about 2 months later and are smaller clones of their species. Hatchlings are 5 to 6 inches long.

Its geographical range is from Delaware to the Florida panhandle, west to Louisiana, eastern Oklahoma and extreme eastern Texas.

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